Lean Into It

So, I recently had a birthday.

Birthdays always find me in an introspective state of mind. I think about the past year of my life, which gets me thinking about other memories and events that shaped me, that created the man who writes these words on a laptop today.

Leo Season came to an end... And the warrior still stands (art by Michael Rechlin)...
Leo Season came to an end… And the warrior still stands (art by Michael Rechlin)…

As an artist, I’m sure that I am not unique in this position. As a human being of a certain age, I am sure that I am in like company when it comes to this acknowledgement concerning the passage of time.

So, during this rumination, I’m also thinking about my next post for the blog when I came across this article from the New York Times:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/20/magazine/can-black-art-ever-escape-the-politics-of-race.html?_r=0

Thank you, universe, for sparking my impetus.

My “click bait” headline when I posted this article through my various platforms was:

“Not only will my work not escape it, I lean into it…”

The fact is that as a creator of color, your work is already political. The nature of America made it political. Even the attempt to be apolitical is a political stance. Unfortunately, it can’t be avoided. So, why try and placate an audience that already views you through a certain lens? Be unapologetic and authentic in your creation. The nature of art is to be provocative, to elicit a feeling, an emotion. Don’t avoid it. Lean into it. That’s my philosophy…

Cover art for Octavia Butler's Wildseed... A major influence on my work...
Cover art for Octavia Butler’s Wildseed… A major influence on my work…

I’m not saying that there is a specific vision of what “Black” writing is. Not only is that an extremely myopic vision, and completely arrogant to assume, but that also plays into viewing yourself through the “other’s” lens.

What I am saying is that the color of our skin makes everything we do political. We can’t escape that. What we can, and must do, is simply be artists. Our skin color and culture do not limit us… It enhances us. So, why try to hide? Why be ashamed? Be diverse! Write or draw whatever you want! But, also be proud and unapologetic of whom you are as a creator. Every example of Creators of Color, from Richard Wright to Zora Neale Hurston to Donald Goines to Kevin Grevioux to N. K. Jemisin to David Durham figured that out. All of them diverse in their thinking and subject matter. All of them Black. And, because they are Black, the other will always think there is an underlying agenda to their work, which makes their work political.

Donald Goines portrayed the dark side of the Black experience with a disturbingly seductive elegance...
Donald Goines portrayed the dark side of the Black experience with a disturbingly seductive elegance…

What part of my saying “be diverse” is confusing to you?

Ultimately, I don’t create for anyone’s approval but my own. Richard Wright didn’t create for anyone else’s approval but his own. I create to celebrate my culture and my people. Comic books are my medium. Because of this, and because of the color of my skin, my work will always be perceived as political… And, I don’t care. In fact, if my work changes a point of view, then I’ve succeeded as a creator.

That’s why we have diverse voices.

I am a fan of Richard Wright’s work as well as Octavia Butler as well as Donald Goines as well as Wole Soyinka as well as Christopher Priest. In short, I read different Black writers with different points of view and diverse voices depicting their unique observation of the human condition. Each one, because they are Black, these authors are considered political writers simply because of their skin color. My voice is unique from theirs, but my skin color is not. Therefore, I am a political artist as well, not because I write about slavery or the ghetto (because I don’t), but because of who I am. I am simply not ashamed of being considered a political artist. In fact, I use my platform, my culture and my voice to inform my craft. The first rule of writing is “Write what you know.” That is simply what I do…

So, I’ll say it before and I’ll say it again…

Everything I make is Protest Art.

http://www.griotenterprises.com

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5 thoughts on “Lean Into It”

  1. Really elegantly written post and definitely some things in here for me to ponder as I try to move through life with less and less ignorance filling my brain.

    The last line is both provocative and simple. I almost wonder if all art isn’t in protest of something? Even as I say that I think about joy art, so no I don’t think it is all in or as a protest. But all art is definitely a spec of the light that is someone’s soul, belief, experience, etc.

    Not really any point here, other than I enjoyed the post. Thanks for sharing.

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